Assignment #0: Hello, World!

The purpose of this initial assignment is to familiarize yourself with the process of running the autograding tests and submitting your work via GitHub Classroom. Even if you are familiar with GitHub Classroom, this assignment will contain several new items that are specific to working with C# assignments.

Getting Started

Let’s set up the assignment on our computer and learn about its basic structure.

First, find Assignment #0 in Canvas and click on the invitation link. After accepting the assignment on the Github Classroom page, go to your assignment repository on GitHub.

Follow the instructions to clone your repository and open it in Visual Studio.

When the solution opens, check out what the repository contains in the Solution Explorer on the left. You will find two projects within the solution.

Note

If you do not see the Solution Explorer, you can open it by selecting View, then Solution Explorer.

Open up the SayHelloClass class in the HelloWorldAutograded project. This is where you will work on your code.

Now, turn your attention to Program.cs in the HelloWorldAutograded project. We have given you some code that will output the string returned by the SayHello() function in SayHelloClass.

To run the program, do the following:

  1. Mac Users: Hit the Run button at the top right-hand corner of the window or right-click on the HelloWorldAutograded project and select Run Project.
  2. Windows Users: Click on the solid green triangle next to the name of the HelloWorldAutograded project. You can also press F5 to run the project.

When the program runs, Visual Studio will open a pane and display program output. Currently, the program has no output. You’ll fix that in a bit.

Running the Autograding Script

For this unit, we encourage you to run the autograding tests yourself before you push your code. This will make it quicker and easier to know whether or not your code is correct. Let’s learn how to run the tests.

In the Solution Explorer, navigate to the test class, AutogradingTests, in the project HelloWorldTests. For each assignment, there will be a test project, which contains all of the autograding tests and may have more than one class.

A test is a single method in a test file that has [TestMethod] just above it. A test file may have multiple tests. To run just one test, you can right-click on the test method name and select Run Test. To run all of the auto-grading tests (in this case, there is only one), you should do the following:

  1. Mac Users: Select Run from the top menu and select Run Unit Tests. After you first run the tests, you can also right-click on the project name and selecting Run Project.
  2. Windows Users: Right-click on the project name and select Run Tests. You can also select Run All Tests in the Test menu tab.

When Visual Studio runs the tests, it opens a pane to display test results. At the left, we see that the test has failed. We can expand the tree to see each of the individual tests (again, in this case there is only one). Selecting one of the tests shows its results to the right.

In this case, the test expected our code to output Hello, World!. Instead, it provided no output at all.

Warning

The autograding tests are VERY exacting. A difference of just one character will result in a failed test. The tests are also case-sensitive. You’ll need to pay attention to detail in order complete your assignments.

When your code is correct, Visual Studio will display a green checkmark indicating passing tests.

Your Task

Your task is simple: make the program print out the string "Hello, World!". Edit the code in the SayHelloClass class, within the SayHello() method. When your code is correct, running the tests will display passing results.

Submitting Your Work

Once you get all of the tests to pass, open up Visual Studio’s Terminal pane. Then you should commit and push your code to GitHub.

Visit your assignment repository page. Near the top right, you’ll see a green checkmark indicating that GitHub has graded your assignment as passing. If you see a red X, then your assignment is not yet correct.

This process will be the same for all of your assignments in this unit. Revisit this page as needed to review instructions on running tests in C# projects.